Jason

Jason

Sep 13, 2019
Published in North Carolina Fishing
BREVARD, N.C. (Sept. 13, 2019)  – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s Pisgah Center for Wildlife Education is offering free outdoor-related workshops for people of all ages and skill levels ...

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Sep 13, 2019
Published in Hawaii Fishing
DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE 
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: September 12, 2019

Loop Road Repair Status Update

(L+hu»e) – On Sunday September 8, 2019 at the King Kaumuali»i Elementary School Cafeteria with the help of Congresswoman Cowden, the DLNR Kaua’i Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) held an informational meeting regarding the timeline and plan for the L+hu‘e-KMloa Forest Reserve Loop Road repair work. It was a great opportunity to hear the community interest and hopes for this area. DOFAW Kaua’i wishes to work better with open communication so that our actions in the future will help create a positive space for the community and future generations to enjoy.

After listening to concerns and comments, DOFAW will begin to start repairs of Loop Road. In the next couple weeks, contractors will begin preparing a staging area for material and equipment off Kuamo»o Road. On September 30, 2019, road repairs will begin, and a gate will be installed just after the powerline trail on Loop Road.  

The major concern during the period of road repair work is the safety of the public and the contractors. Therefore, the gate will remain closed from Monday to Friday during the construction period. We understand the relationship that the community has with the area and agree it would be beneficial to have the road open on the weekends for the public.  However, during the construction period, if there is vandalism or destruction to newly repaired sections, DOFAW will have to close the gate on weekends as to not hinder the progress of the repairs.

DOFAW will regularly communicate with the community on the Loop road repair status and will try to complete repairs as soon as possible.

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Media Contact:

AJ McWhorter
Communications Specialist
Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
808-587-0396 (Communications Office)

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Sep 12, 2019
Published in Hawaii Fishing
DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE 
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: September 12, 2019

LAND MANAGERS, BIOLOGISTS & LAW ENFORCEMENT CONCERNED ABOUT HUMAN IMPACTS ON RARE PLANTS & ANIMALS DUE TO CONTINUING PROTEST

 (Honolulu) – The DLNR Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE) is investigating the possible destruction of four, endangered Hawaiian »nunu vines in the Mauna Loa Forest Reserve on the backside of Pu‘u Huluhulu.  This is where thousands of protesters have been illegally blocking Mauna Kea Access Road since mid-July. In addition to the alleged cutting of these vines, DOCARE officers found evidence that other rare plants have been trampled, either inadvertently or intentionally.

“The destruction of the »nunu vine is particularly disturbing, since there may be only five populations of this species still in existence,” said DLNR Chair Suzanne Case. »nunu is federally listed as an endangered plant and under the Hawai‘i Natural Heritage Ranking it is considered critically imperiled.

Rare and endangered plants were out-planted on State Land by natural resource teams from federal agencies which manage threatened and endangered species in the area. The »nunu vine is naturally occurring, but the restoration efforts help it to thrive. The damaged vines were not cut in the out-planting section but one other threatened or endangered species of imperiled plants were stepped on there. Federal officials are also concerned about access to national wildlife refuge and the potential impacts to endangered Hawaiian goose (nn) management efforts as the breeding season begins.

While protest leaders have taken steps to restrict access to the top of Pu‘u Huluhulu cinder cone, DOCARE estimates as many as 2,400 people have been around Pu‘u Huluhulu at any given time, for the past seven weeks. DOCARE Officer Edwin Shishido and another officer hiked to the out-planting area on August 21st and discovered that four »nunu vines appeared to have been cut or ripped from koa trees.

“An unmarked, ‘social’ trail led into the area, and two other federally and state listed endangered plants were laying across the trail indicating they’d been recently trampled,” Shishido said. The plants appear to have recovered.

“This area of Pu‘u Huluhulu was specifically set aside to propagate these native Hawaiian plants,” explained Lyman Perry, a botanist with the DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW). “It’s difficult to establish a viable population of these extremely rare plants, to keep them from facing extinction, so the PTA out-planting area was picked for the very reason that it saw little to no human impact,” Perry added.

In addition to negative impacts to plants from thousands of people being in the area, there’s evidence that just the sheer number of people is adversely impacting animals and insects.

Ian Cole, DOFAW’s East Hawai‘i Wildlife Manager said there are anecdotal reports that Hawai‘i’s State Bird, the nn, are avoiding the immediate area around the protest site. Cole explained, “We have reports that nn are avoiding landing around Mauna Kea Access Road and Daniel K. Inouye Highway (Saddle Road). It’s not surprising that they’re looking for different foraging areas…there are too many people around for their comfort.  This area was likely one of their flyway resting areas.”

Even the smallest of creatures are potentially being impacted by the nearly two-month long protest action.  Entomologists report that the endemic Hawaiian wolf spider, which inhabits the area’s lava fields, is possibly being forced out of its natural habitat due to the large number of people camping and walking in the area.  Previously researchers noted that the spider moved away from the location of a hale built by protesters at HalepMhaku, about six miles from the current protest location. They recorded a decline in the number of spiders and an increase in invasive insects.

Chair Case remarked, “Early on in this protest we warned about potential impacts to endangered species from off-trail activities.  Intentional or not, it’s happening, and it’s very concerning.  You just can’t have thousands of people in sensitive natural areas like Pu»u Huluhulu without this kind of harm resulting.  DLNR’s mission is to protect these species, and our staff is passionate about doing so, and it’s sad to see this now.”

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Media Contact:

Dan Dennison
Senior Communications Manager
(808) 587-0396
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Sep 12, 2019
Published in North Carolina Fishing
RALEIGH, N.C. (Sept. 12, 2019) – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has designated Saturday, Sept. 28, as a Youth Deer Hunting Day for 2019. On this day, youth 17 and younger may use any legal ...

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Sep 11, 2019
Published in North Carolina Fishing
The Thursday, September 12, 2019 Commission Telephonic Meeting Agenda is available for download at the link below. September 12, 2019 Commission Telephonic Meeting Agenda  (PDF)

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Sep 11, 2019
Published in Hawaii Fishing
DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE 
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: September 11, 2019

AS OCEAN WATERS HEAT UP EVIDENCE OF CORAL BLEACHING IS APPEARING

Corals Off Maui Nui Showing Impacts

To view video please click on photo or view at this link: https://vimeo.com/359135986

(Honolulu) – The severe and widespread coral bleaching event predicted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is already occurring along reefs across the state.

Last week, a team from the DLNR Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR) conducted a rapid assessment of coral health at Molokini and along Maui’s south shore from Makena to Maalaea.

Russell Sparks, a DAR Aquatic Biologist reported, “Molokini is composed of high percentages of the coral species, Montipora capitata, and we found roughly 50% of this coral already bleached or paling heavily.”  The team found in waters off Makena, Wailea, and Kihei the percentage of corals showing bleaching currently at less than 10%.  Sparks said that reefs in dirty water (closer to shore at Kalama Park and other areas in North Kihei) are doing better than in similar areas with cleaner water.  This may be due to the shading effect of dirty water reducing some of the stress from direct sunlight on these corals. At Olowalu, routine monitoring in August did detect numerous Porities corals bleached and overgrown with turf algae.

Dr. Jamison Gove, a NOAA Research Oceanographer said, “Ocean temperatures remain well above average across much of the state. Areas along West Hawai‘i and Maui Nui are especially warm, as much as 3 – 3.5°F above typical summertime temperatures. Warm ocean temperatures are expected to persist in the coming weeks, likely worsening the coral bleaching that has recently been observed across the islands.”

NOAA, DAR and the Arizona State University Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science (ASU-GDCS) have joined forces to collaborate on coral reef science, conservation, and management in Hawai‘i. One of the outcomes of this partnership is the creation of a coral bleaching alert card, which depicts six, simple steps people can take to reduce any additional stress on corals during the current bleaching event.

Dr. Greg Asner, the Director of ASU-GDCS commented, “My team has partnered with DAR and NOAA as a technical source for advanced aircraft and satellite monitoring of reefs throughout the main Hawaiian Islands.  We launched the website, www.hawaiicoral.org to provide a simple, but advanced platform that integrates coral observations made by residents and visitors with observations made from the air and Earth orbit.  The outcome is a real-time monitoring system that informs citizens as fast as scientists are getting data.  Together, we can not only monitor this terrible bleaching event, but also work to reduce secondary stress on the most impacted reefs. After the heatwave ends, we will have a good map with which to plan restoration efforts.”

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Media Contact:

Dan Dennison
Senior Communications Manager
(808) 587-0396
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Sep 11, 2019
Published in North Carolina Fishing
FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. (Sept. 11, 2019)  – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s John E. Pechmann Fishing Education Center is offering free workshops for people of all ages and skill levels in ...

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Sep 11, 2019
Published in North Carolina Fishing
RALEIGH, N.C. (Sept. 11, 2019) – Biologists with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission have finished another year of waterbird surveys along the coast and have documented a record number of ...

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Sep 10, 2019
Published in North Carolina Fishing
ROANOKE RAPIDS, N.C. (Sept. 10, 2019) — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, along with volunteers and other entities, recently finished up a sixth year of habitat enhancement on Lake Gaston , ...

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Sep 10, 2019
Published in North Carolina Fishing
RALEIGH, N.C. (Sept. 10, 2019) – See a pine snake in the woods? The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission wants to know. Agency biologists are asking the public to help them learn more about the ...

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