Jason

Jason

Jun 30, 2020
Published in Hawaii Fishing
DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: June 29, 2020

COVID-19 RULES FOR COMMERCIAL & RECREATIONAL BOATS RELAXED

(Honolulu) – The State of Hawai῾i, through the Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR), Division of Boating and Ocean Recreation (DOBOR), with the concurrence of the Counties of Hawai‘i, Maui, Kauai, and of the City and County of Honolulu, is lifting certain COVID-19 emergency restrictions imposed on larger commercial and recreational boating, and on ocean recreation.

DOBOR Administrator Ed Underwood said, “This change in rules is effective immediately and allows commercial and recreational boats, with a rated U.S. Coast Guard capacity of more than ten, to not exceed their rated capacity by no more than 50 percent, provided they operating under the Boating and Ocean Recreation COVID-19 guidelines, linked below.

These “Act With Care” phase guidelines are based on Dept. of Health and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, as well as input from boaters in Hawai‘i and in coordination with the counties. The protocols cover physical distancing, hygiene protocols, staffing, and cleaning and disinfecting.

 

All crews and passengers are covered by these rules and they apply to all commercial and recreational boats in all four counties.

# # #

 

Guidelines Attached

Web Link: https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/dobor/covid-19-dobor-response/

 

 

Media Contact:

Dan Dennison

Senior Communications Manager

(808) 587-0396

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Jun 30, 2020
Published in Hawaii Fishing
DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: June 29, 2020

 

STATE CONTINUES EXPLORING OPTIONS FOR REMOVAL OF UXO AT MOLOKINI CRATER

 

(Honolulu) – Balancing public safety, while providing a high level of protection for the aquatic environment are the overarching considerations being discussed by the Hawai‘i Dept. of Land and Natural Resources and the Hawai‘i Dept. of Health, for the safe remediation of two WWII-era bombs off of Molokini Crater in Maui County, in state ocean waters.

 

Recent social media postings have suggested, that the U.S.Navy, with the State’s concurrence, plan to “blow up Molokini.”  DLNR Chair Suzanne Case said, “We continue a careful and deliberative process to identify the best strategy to render this unexploded ordnance (UXO) safe while protecting the marine environment. This process began more than six months ago, and no final decisions have been made and will not be made without public engagement. It’s important we hear from stakeholders.”

 

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, Molokini attracted hundreds of thousand of boaters and snorkelers each year, attracted by the crater’s rich underwater life. “In no way do we, as the agency responsible for the protection of Hawai‘i‘s natural resources, want to agree to anything that might create unmitigated damage,” added Case. “Conversely, we must be mindful of the potential hazard to human health and safety this UXO can pose,” Case said.

 

The state agencies are asking people to be patient, to let the process continue, and to arm themselves with accurate information, in order to knowledgeably contribute to the upcoming public discourse about how to render UXO around Molokini safe.

The 3 R’s of UXO safety:

  • Recognize – when you may have encountered a munition and the potential danger
  • Retreat – do not approach, touch, move or disturb it and carefully leave the area
  • Report – call 911 or the DOH HEER Office at (808) 586-5815

# # #

 

 

Media Contact:

Dan Dennison

Senior Communications Manager

(808) 587-0396

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Read more

Jun 30, 2020
Published in Hawaii Fishing
DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: June 29, 2020

PLUM HARVEST TO BEGIN AT KŌKE‘E STATE PARK

(LĪHU‘E) — The annual plum harvest begins Saturday, July 4 at Kōke‘e State Park on Kaua‘i. Permits to harvest will be available, as it has been in past years, starting on Independence Day at the park’s headquarters.

Free harvest permits are available at the park’s headquarters must be completed there and then returned to the headquarters’  drop-box after harvesting.  Plum picking is permitted between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. in designated areas.

While plum season is a cultural staple on Kaua‘i, the stone fruits are not native to the island. The Hawaiian Journal of History notes  plums were brought to Kaua‘i in the 1930’s and planted on lands  that later became Kōke‘e State Park.

Each person can   take up to five pounds of plums each day for personal consumption. Other conditions are specified on the plum harvesting permit. A short pole with a net will make harvesting easier.

For years, including this one, the crop has been on the decline due to weather, over harvesting, and damage to trees. Optimum harvesting hasn’t happened  since the 1950’s and in 2014, the DLNR Division of State Parks personnel that Kaua‘i hadn’t seen a good crop in more than five years.

Plum pickers are reminded to help prevent forest fires and to pick up their litter.

# # #

Media Contact:

Giovonni Parks

Communications Specialist

Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

808-587-0396 (Communications Office)

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Jun 29, 2020
Published in North Carolina Fishing
RALEIGH, N.C. (June 29, 2020)  – From July 3–5, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s law enforcement division will focus on boating law compliance on North Carolina’s waterways and spread ...

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Jun 25, 2020
Published in Hawaii Fishing
DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: June 25, 2020

ADULT ROCK WALLABY RETURNS TO THE FOREST

Nuuanu Homeowner Captured Wallaby on Tuesday 

An adult, Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby was returned to State forest land on O‘ahu today by a team from the DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW). The animal was captured by a Nu‘uanu homeowner on Tuesday and was initially taken to the Hawaiian Humane Society, which contacted DOFAW and in turn the wallaby was given a health check by personnel from the Honolulu Zoo.

Wallabies are not native to Hawai‘i, but they are not considered invasive, and are protected by state law. They’re only found on O‘ahu, apparently the result of a single pair escaping from a private zoo in Kalihi more than one hundred years ago, in 1916.

DOFAW Wildlife Biologist Jason Misaki said, “Occasionally a single wallaby will wander into a neighborhood and that of course gets everyone’s attention, as they tend to stay in their colony in the forest.” The population is not actively monitored, but research literature from studies in 1981 and 1982 indicates a stable population at that time of fewer than 100 animals.

Researchers noted that the O‘ahu wallabies are definitely rock wallabies that are native to Australia, so named for their “wonderful agility among the rock precipices of their chosen habitat in both Australia and Hawai‘i,” (Explorers Journal, June 1981). That article cited a detailed 1971 study of the Kalihi wallaby population which noted the animals feed on guava, ulei berry, Christmas berry, and other fruits and berries.

Misaki added, “Wallabies do fall under our jurisdiction, but because they really don’t create any problems in our forest ecosystems, we pretty much let them exist in peace. When one is captured it is a novel situation for our staff, who typically deal with native forest animals. We work to quickly return the animal to the forest.” Misaki said the release location is located as far as possible from homes and structures so the wallaby hopefully doesn’t come into contact with people again.

# # #

Media Contact:

Dan Dennison
Senior Communications Manager
(808) 587-0407
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Read more

Jun 27, 2020
Published in Hawaii Fishing
DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: June 26, 2020

UNGULATE CONTROL PROGRAM AND HUNTING ANNOUNCED FOR THE PU‘U WA‘AWA‘A FOREST RESERVE

(HILO) — Ungulate control for feral goat, sheep, and pigs is opening for the Pu‘u Wa‘awa‘a Forest Reserve on Hawai’i Island. The DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) also announces the opening of the hunting season for youth and disabled hunters and in the makai sections of the reserve.

Dates for each season:

  • Special Youth and Disabled Hunt Season: August 1 – 30, 2020
  • Makai Archery Season: August 1 – 23, 2020
  • Makai Muzzleloader Season: August 29 – September 13, 2020

The special ungulate control program hunts for the reserve’s makai and mauka sections are as follows:

  • Makai Ungulate Control Programs
Archery: July 18 – 26, 2020 Muzzleloader: September 19 – 27, 2020
  • Mauka Ungulate Control Program: August 29 – September 27, 2020

Hunting days for all seasons and ungulate control programs are on weekends and State holidays. Hunters should check in at the Pu‘u Wa‘awa‘a hunter check-in station beginning at 5:00 a.m. the day of their hunt and must be checked out by 7:45 p.m. No camping is allowed in the hunting area on any night before or during the hunt.

Hunters will need to purchase goat and ram tags to legally hunt these species in these areas. Tags can be purchased by mail or at the Pu‘u Wa‘awa‘a hunter check-in station on each hunting day between 5:00 a.m. and 12:00 p.m.

To purchase tags by mail, hunters must send a copy of their 2021 State of Hawai‘i Hunting License, a check or money order payable to DLNR, and a self-addressed stamped envelope to: 66-1220A Lalamilo Road, Kamuela, Hawai‘i, 96743.

Please allow for a two-week turnaround to receive tags. For information on daily and seasonal bag limits, tag fees, and other important information see the link below. Bag limits for the ungulate control programs are one (1) pig, one (1) non-typical ram, and three (3) goats per hunter per day.

There will be no compensation for any hunting days lost due to unforeseen circumstances ( COVID-19, wildland fire, hurricane, etc.).

# # #

RESOURCES

 

DOFAW Office at Kamuela – (808) 887-6063.

 

http://dlnr.hawaii.gov/recreation

 

Title 13, Chapter 123, “Rules Regulating Game Mammal Hunting”

https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/dofaw/files/2014/10/Exhibit-4a-Game-Mammals-Standard.pdf

 

Media Contact:

Giovonni Parks

Communications Specialist

Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

808-587-0396 (Communications Office)

Read more

Jun 27, 2020
Published in Hawaii Fishing
DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: June 26, 2020

EARLY CLOSURES FOR WEST HAWAI’I STATE PARKS ON 4TH OF JULY

(KAILUA-KONA) — Several West Hawai’i state parks will experience early closures on Independence Day. The DLNR Division of State Parks will close the following parks at 5:00 pm on Saturday, July 4:

  • Kekaha Kai State Park, the Manini’owali (Kua Bay) section. The Mahai’ula section will be closed that day.
  • Hapuna Beach State Recreation Area, including the Waialea Bay section.
  • Lapakahi State Park.
  • Kiholo State Park Reserve.

Current park hours will resume on Sunday.

The early closure of these facilities is to discourage the use of fireworks, which are prohibited in state parks, and to protect people and the natural resources of the parks.

# # #

Media Contact:

Giovonni Parks

Communications Specialist

Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

808-587-0396 (Communications Office)

Read more

Jun 25, 2020
Published in Hawaii Fishing
DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: June 25, 2020

ADULT ROCK WALLABY RETURNS TO THE FOREST

Nuuanu Homeowner Captured Wallaby on Tuesday 

An adult, Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby was returned to State forest land on O‘ahu today by a team from the DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW). The animal was captured by a Nu‘uanu homeowner on Tuesday and was initially taken to the Hawaiian Humane Society, which contacted DOFAW and in turn the wallaby was given a health check by personnel from the Honolulu Zoo.

Wallabies are not native to Hawai‘i, but they are not considered invasive, and are protected by state law. They’re only found on O‘ahu, apparently the result of a single pair escaping from a private zoo in Kalihi more than one hundred years ago, in 1916.

DOFAW Wildlife Biologist Jason Misaki said, “Occasionally a single wallaby will wander into a neighborhood and that of course gets everyone’s attention, as they tend to stay in their colony in the forest.” The population is not actively monitored, but research literature from studies in 1981 and 1982 indicates a stable population at that time of fewer than 100 animals.

Researchers noted that the O‘ahu wallabies are definitely rock wallabies that are native to Australia, so named for their “wonderful agility among the rock precipices of their chosen habitat in both Australia and Hawai‘i,” (Explorers Journal, June 1981). That article cited a detailed 1971 study of the Kalihi wallaby population which noted the animals feed on guava, ulei berry, Christmas berry, and other fruits and berries.

Misaki added, “Wallabies do fall under our jurisdiction, but because they really don’t create any problems in our forest ecosystems, we pretty much let them exist in peace. When one is captured it is a novel situation for our staff, who typically deal with native forest animals. We work to quickly return the animal to the forest.” Misaki said the release location is located as far as possible from homes and structures so the wallaby hopefully doesn’t come into contact with people again.

# # #

Media Contact:

Dan Dennison
Senior Communications Manager
(808) 587-0407
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Read more

Jun 25, 2020
Published in North Carolina Fishing
RALEIGH, N.C. (June 25, 2020) – Over the last few weeks, biologists with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission have experienced an uptick in calls from people who are seeing bears in ...

Read more

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