Jason

Jason

By: Susan K Gildersleeve, EDIS editor, UF/IFAS Communications, (352) 294-3318, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Florida’s Apalachicola Bay has long been known for its oyster harvesting and processing industry, but a steady decline in oyster landings in the Bay has threatened the industry. The complex nature of the human and natural systems that together affect Apalachicola’s oyster reefs has created uncertainty about the long-term sustainability of the oyster fishing industry in Franklin County, which has prompted many questions about the ecology of the Bay and the economy of the region from a variety of stakeholders that directly or indirectly depend on the survival and successful restoration of the Apalachicola Bay oyster fishery. This 5-page fact sheet estimates the potential economic impacts associated with a successfully restored oyster reef in Apalachicola Bay, basing estimates on different hypothetical oyster harvest goals. Written by Robert Botta, Ed Camp, Christa Court, Caleb Stair, and Charles Adams and published by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department, it is designed to inform decision making and discussions related to restoration and resource management in the region.

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Florida Sea Grant affiliate researcher, Ashley Smyth, will be featured this Saturday, January 9, on the CBS television show, Mission Unstoppable with Miranda Cosgrove! The program “celebrates women who have become superstars in STEM-related careers” and is geared to a K-12 audience.

Ashley Smyth on Mission Unstoppable

On the show, Smyth, who is an assistant professor of biogeochemistry in the UF Department of Soil and Water Sciences at the UF/IFAS Tropical Research and Education Center, talks about the value of oysters to coastal ecosystems, especially their role in improving water quality. She and correspondent Erica Hernandez watch oysters filter water, visit with an oyster farmer, and talk about what biogeochemists and marine biologists do.

“I want to show that marine biologists also study mud and oysters,” Smyth said. “I hope this gets young girls excited about being covered in mud and doing science — that they can do this too.”

Check local listings for showtimes. The episode, called Foragers, Filter Feeders and Phones, will also be posted on the program’s Facebook page and YouTube channel.

The post FSG Affiliate Researcher Talks Oysters & Ecosystems on CBS’s Mission Unstoppable appeared first on Florida Sea Grant.

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The holidays are here, and so are North Carolina’s most popular hunting days. Christmas Eve and Christmas Day have traditionally been high traffic hunting days, and with more people recreating ...

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An online public hearing for proposed 2021-2022 fishing, hunting, trapping, and game land regulations, including Sunday Hunting, is scheduled for 6:30 p.m., Jan. 21, 2021 .

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RALEIGH, N.C. – The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission revealed the winner of the 2020 Wildlife in North Carolina Photo Competition this week. The winning image is a portrait shot of a common ...

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PISGAH FOREST, N.C. - The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission announced that the Pisgah Center for Wildlife Education located in Pisgah Forest will begin offering virtual educational programs ...

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DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE 
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: December 31, 2020

DLNR COMPLETES PARALLEL REVIEW OF MAUNA KEA COMPREHENSIVE  MANAGEMENT PLAN 

 

To view video please click on photo or view at this link: https://vimeo.com/184293366

(Honolulu) – DLNR has completed its independent review of the Mauna Kea Comprehensive Management Plan implementation by the University of Hawai‘i (UH). 

Over the past seven months, the review was conducted independently for DLNR by Kuiʻwalu Consulting, to provide DLNR and the Board of Land and Natural Resources relevant information as to whether Mauna Kea is being effectively managed.   

Noting the contentious context of Mauna Kea in recent years, Kuʻiwalu sought extensive public and stakeholder input through multiple venues on various aspects of the comprehensive management plan’s implementation. 

The independent evaluation found that the UH Office of Mauna Kea Management (OMKM) has made progress in implementing most of the Comprehensive Management Plan’s management actions, and it appears that OMKM has been effective at managing natural and cultural resources on Mauna Kea.  The report noted, “We heard many comments that the cultural and natural resources on the state conservation lands on Mauna Kea are some of the best managed and protected lands in the entire State.  The area is clear of trash, the invasive species are being removed not only by OMKM but volunteer groups, and the OMKM Rangers to ensure public safety on Mauna Kea.” 

At the same time, the independent evaluation also found that OMKM has not effectively implemented the Comprehensive Management Plan in three major process areas:  (1) untimely adoption of administrative rules to manage public access and regulate commercial activities; (2) inadequate consultation with members of the Native Hawaiian community, both those who oppose and support UH’s management of Mauna Kea, on matters related to cultural and resources issues; and (3) ineffective engagement with the community, in particular, members of the Native Hawaiian community, on education and outreach efforts, including decision-making processes related to the management of Mauna Kea. 

“We deeply appreciate the thorough and transparent work of Dawn Chang and the Kuʻiwalu  Project team on this challenging topic, and we especially appreciate all of the more than 500 people who opted to participate in the process to make sure we heard multiple voices and points of view,” said DLNR Chair Suzanne Case. 

“The results show overall solid management by UH on the protection of the mountain’s natural and cultural resources,” Case commented, “but lacking in the equally important work of relationship building and meaningful inclusion of many people who care deeply about the mauna.  This work will certainly help DLNR and the Board of Land and Natural Resources better understand and oversee management of Mauna Kea.” 

Chair Case noted that the independent evaluation is not a report on the proposed Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). UH leases approximately 11,000 acres of State lands on Mauna Kea, of which 525 acres is in the Astronomy Precinct and 10,700 acres are designated as Natural/Cultural Preservation Area. The Comprehensive Management Plan covers all of the UH leased land and was approved by the Board of Land and Natural Resources in 2009.  

The Independent Evaluation of the Implementation of the Mauna Kea Comprehensive Management Plan can be found on DLNR’s website at https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/occl/maunakea-management/https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/occl/maunakea-management/ 

 and on the Project website at Mauna Kea – Comprehensive Management Plan (evaluatethecmp.com) A number of background documents are also contained on both websites, and will be maintained on the Project website through January 31, 2021. After that date the documents will be moved to DLNR’s website for public reference. 

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Media Contact: 

Dan Dennison 
Senior Communications Manager 
(808) 587-0396 
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

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DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE 
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: January 2, 2021

INVESTIGATION UNDERWAY AFTER APPARENT SHARK INCIDENT ON HAWAII ISLAND

(Kailua-Kona, Hawai‘i) – A woman, reported to be in her 70’s, was taken to the hospital this morning after what appears to be a shark bite incident. 

The DLNR Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE), in conjunction with Hawai‘i County authorities have placed shark warning signs, one-mile, on either side of Anaeho‘omalu Bay on the Kohala Coast at Waikōloa, after the woman was injured around 8 this morning. 

The captain of an ocean sports vessel reported the incident, after hearing calls for help coming from near a channel marker, an estimated 600-feet offshore. A tender from the Spirit of Aloha tour vessel was used to take the woman to shore, where she was transported to North Hawai‘i Community Hospital in Waimea. DLNR does not release names or medical conditions of victims. 

A Hawai‘i Fire Department (HFD) helicopter flew over the area and its crew did not spot any shark activity. In keeping with standard protocols, shark warning signs will remain in place until noon on Sunday, after HFD does another surveillance flight. 

# # # 

 

Media Contact: 

Dan Dennison 
Senior Communications Manager 
(808) 587-0396 
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

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DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE 
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: January 5, 2021

WAILOA RIVER STATE RECREATION AREA OCCUPIERS GIVEN CEASE & DESIST ORDER

To view video please click on photo or view at this link: https://vimeo.com/497455016

(HILO) – A group of people who have illegally taken over a portion of Wailoa River State Recreation Area were notified this morning to cease and desist by 5pm tomorrow (Wednesday, Jan. 6).

Officers from the DLNR Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE) taped one order on a sign the group had put up at the park’s entrance. Another was presented to the group’s leader and another was posted in a small encampment.

The group has planted between 50 and 60 taro plants and banana trees across a football-sized field in the popular and widely used State park. The participants are claiming jurisdiction over the park. They don’t have any permits for planting or for erecting signs at Wailoa.

Today a man sat at the park’s entrance drumming. Another person was mowing grass around the fresh plantings.

Eight years ago, the man leading the group was cited after similar illegal activities at Wailoa. DOCARE is working closely with the DLNR Division of State Parks to return the area to public usage.

DOCARE Chief Jason Redulla said, “No matter their professed claims of ownership, this  recreation area and all other State Parks belong to all of Hawai‘i for the enjoyment by residents and visitors. Park users have expressed concerns that members of this group are ignoring County and State mandates to wear masks during the COVID-19 pandemic.” Today about a dozen people appeared to be part of the group. Last weekend, media reports indicate the number had swelled to 75 or more.

The Cease and Desist order requires the group to remove tents and other camping gear or the materials will be considered abandoned property.

# # #

Media Contact:

Dan Dennison
Senior Communications Manager
(808) 587-0396
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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