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Nov 27, 2020
Published in Hawaii Fishing
DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE 
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: November 26, 2020

SHARK WARNING SIGNS UP IN WEST MAUI FOLLOWING AFTERNOON INCIDENT 

(Kahului) – Warning signs are up on either side of Honokowai Beach Park in West Maui after an apparent shark incident this afternoon. Officers from the DLNR Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE) put signs up north from Kahana Village Vacation Rentals and south to Papakea Resort, just north of Airport beach. 

It was reported that a woman, visiting from California, was swimming 100-yards off-shore of Mahina Surf Condominiums when a companion near-by saw a fin in the water and reported the woman was bitten by a shark. She was taken to the hospital.  

DOCARE officers and personnel from the DLNR Division of Aquatics Resources (DAR) will conduct a further inquiry into the details of the incident. Standard protocol is for warning signs to remain up until noon, the day following an incident, after the waters have been patrolled by county and/or state officials to detect any further shark presence. 

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Media Contact: 

Dan Dennison 
Senior Communications Manager 
(808) 587-0396 
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

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Nov 27, 2020
Published in Hawaii Fishing
DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE 
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: November 27, 2020

MOLOKA‘I FORESTS TO BE PROTECTED FROM WILDFIRES & EROSION

State receives$1.8 million National Fish and Wildlife Foundation award

To view video please click on photo or view at this link: https://vimeo.com/483721904

(MOLOKA’I) – Forests on the southern slopes of Moloka‘i are about to receive additional protections from threats like wildfires, erosion, and flooding thanks to a new award from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF). The foundation has awarded over $1.8 million to the DLNR to address threats using proven tools such as fencing and removing hooved animals, as well as creating firebreaks.

The results will include clearer ocean waters, vibrant reefs, restored plants and trees, and fewer disruptions along the islands’ main road, Highway 450. State funding that served as a match for the grant is part of a larger Watershed Initiative that is directing an additional $2 million of State Capital Improvement Project (CIP) and operating funds to protect Molokai’s forests and employ Molokaʻi residents. 

“Watershed CIP funds authorized by the State Legislature provided most of the match needed to apply for this grant. As a result, we’re able to invest in the community by providing much needed jobs and protection of our forests and other natural resources,” said Senator J. Kalani English, who represents Hāna, East and Upcountry Maui, Molokaʻi and Lānaʻi.

“I’m delighted that this State funding has been able to attract more Federal and private funding that will create more jobs on Moloka‘i while helping preserve our forests and reefs,” said Representative Lynn DeCoite, who represents Molokaʻi, Lānaʻi, and East Maui. 

Some Federal and foundation funds are available only when a matching investment can be demonstrated. Since 2013, State Watershed Initiative funds have brought in over $36 million in Federal, County, and private funds for forest protection projects statewide.  “Combined funding creates jobs and benefits nature. It’s a win-win,” said Suzanne Case, DLNR Chairperson.

“The National Coastal Resilience Fund supports projects that restore natural systems in order to reduce risks to local communities and also enhance habitat for fish and wildlife,” said Erika Feller, Director of Coastal and Marine Conservation for NFWF. “We are excited to support DLNR’s work to restore native forests, which will help to reduce risks of flooding, landslides, and fire to communities on Molokaʻi, and will lead to healthier habitat for native species.”

The East Molokaʻi Watershed Partnership, led by The Nature Conservancy (TNC), involves DLNR and other agencies, landowners, and community organizations working to develop a landscape-level management plan to address problems across the south slope, where dirt washes down to the ocean and clogs fishponds, kills corals which need sunlight to grow, and feeds invasive algae that smothers the reef. This funding enables the partners to continue protecting Molokai’s remaining native forests that hold the soil and absorb rainwater, and where possible, restore areas converted to bare dirt by wildfires, and hooved animals. 

“Each budget session our Maui County Council allocates significantly to forest watershed protection efforts countywide,” said Council Vice Chair Keani Rawlins-Fernandez, who serves as the Economic Development and Budget Committee Chair, “and being from Molokai, where subsistence is our way of life, funding resource management is highly prioritized.” 

“Moloka’i depends on our natural resources to sustain our lifestyle. Protecting our watershed and restoring our forests protect our reefs. Taking care of Mauka takes care of Makai,” said Stacy Crivello, Molokai Community Liaison for Mayor Michael Victorino, County of Maui.

“The ʻōlelo no‘eau (Hawaiian proverb) ‘Inā e lepo ke kumu wai, e hō‘ea ana ka lepo ikai’ means ‘If the source of the water is dirty, muddy water will travel to the sea,’” said Ulalia Woodside, Director of The Nature Conservancy, Hawaiʻi chapter. “By restoring forests, we counter that possibility and provide jobs that allow the people of Molokaʻi to give back to the nature that sustains them.”

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Media Contact:

AJ McWhorter
Communications Specialist
Hawai’i Department of Land and Natural Resources
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
808-587-0396 (Communications Office)

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Nov 26, 2020
Published in Hawaii Fishing
DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE 
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: November 25, 2020

BROKEN CORALS RESTORED TO CORAL REEF AT MAKAKŌ BAY

(Kailua-Kona) – On November 6, 2020 DLNR Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR) staff on Hawai’i Island responded to a report of numerous live coral fragments scattered below the base of a popular manta dive site mooring at Makakō Bay (Garden Eel Cove) in North Kona. DAR Kona staff documented numerous broken coral colonies along the mooring line and approximately 150 broken coral fragments in the sand at the base of the mooring. The definitive cause of the damage could not be determined and likely occurred more than two weeks prior to the report.

DAR biologists and staff ending up restored more than 80 healthy coral fragments to the surrounding coral reef using specialized marine epoxy. Unfortunately, a portion of the coral fragments were buried in the sand and are no longer viable. DAR will monitor the transplanted corals over the next year to evaluate their health and regrowth success.  

Branching corals in West Hawai‘i recently experienced a severe bleaching and mortality event resulting in the loss of a large portion of the population in the region. Branching corals provide important habitat to many other reef creatures, including juvenile fish. “Because of the ecological importance of this type of coral and its need for recovery, state rules preventing coral damage are critically important. We were glad that a portion of these damaged corals could be given a second chance to survive,” said DAR/Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit (PCSU) Monitoring Coordinator Lindsey Kramer.

The taking, breaking or damaging of any stony corals or live rock is prohibited under Hawai’i Administrative Rules (HAR).

# # #

Media contact:

AJ McWhorter
Communications Specialist
Hawai’i Department of Land and Natural Resources
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
808-587-0396 (Communications Office)

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Nov 25, 2020
Published in Hawaii Fishing
DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE 
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: November 25, 2020

‘IAO VALLEY STATE MONUMENT HAS REOPENED

(Wailuku) – The DLNR Division of State Parks reopened ʻIao Valley State Monument November 21 on Maui.  The scenic park had been closed during most of the COVID-19 period due to crowding concerns and budgetary constraints.  ʻIao Valley, one of the most visited parks on Maui, contains a short hiking path and iconic views of Kuka‘emoku, popularly known as the ʻIao Needle.  Visitors are reminded to adhere to social distancing rules and wear protective masks when visiting the often-crowded park.  The new hours will be 7am-6pm, daily. 

Newly approved parking and entry fees – for out-of-State residents and commercial vehicles – will apply.  Only credit cards will be accepted for payment. Residents are not subject to parking and entry fees at any Hawaiʻi State Parks.  

New parking and entry fees for ʻIao Valley State Monument:

Nonresidents: $10.00 per vehicle, $5.00 per individual walk-in.

Per commercial PUC vehicle:

1 to 7 passenger vehicle $25.00

8 to 25 passenger vehicle $50.00

26+ passenger vehicle $90.00

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Media contact:

AJ McWhorter
Communications Specialist
Hawai’i Department of Land and Natural Resources
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
808-587-0396 (Communications Office)

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Nov 19, 2020
Published in Florida Fishing

Image credit: Greater Amberjack by Diane Peebles

By: Lourdes Rodriguez, 954-577-6363 office, 954-242-8439 mobile, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

A gap of knowledge surrounding the status and future of the Greater Amberjack (Seriola dumerili) is the driving force behind a $10 Million project involving the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Florida Sea Grant. The 2020-2023 Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic Greater Amberjack Research Program is funded by Congress and is at the public input stage.

“We are looking to reach all stakeholders involved in the greater amberjack fishery – from recreational anglers to commercial and even seafood dealers,” said Shelly Krueger, a Florida Sea Grant agent at UF/IFAS Extension Monroe County. “Living in the Florida Keys, our locals regularly fish in both the Gulf of Mexico and the South Atlantic, so we look forward to their unique perspective on this migratory schooling species.”

The greater amberjack is an important recreational and commercial fish species in the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic regions and filling in knowledge gaps will help determine what it takes to sustainably manage the future of this fishery.

“Multiple data gaps have been identified for greater amberjack, including better estimates of recreational fishing efforts, impacts of predators on amberjack during capture and after release, spawning activity, population connectivity, habitat selection and much more,” said Angela Collins, a Florida Sea Grant agent at UF/IFAS Extension Manatee County.

UF/IFAS Florida Sea Grant and faculty from UF’s School of Fisheries are leading a visioning process with Sea Grant programs in nine other states across the Southeast including Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas. At the center of the process are six upcoming virtual listening sessions scheduled for December.

“We have obtained input on management issues and data gaps from stakeholders throughout the region and drafted research priorities for the program” said Kai Lorenzen, a professor of fisheries at UF who is leading the visioning process. “In a final step, stakeholders are invited to give feedback on draft research priorities at six virtual listening sessions scheduled for early December.”

To participate in one or more of the virtual listening sessions listed, click on the date with the link to the registration, and participation links will be provided via email. Participants can attend more than one listening session, if desired.

Gulf of Mexico Region:

Texas: December 7, 6-8 pm CDT

Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama: December 8, 3-5 pm CDT

Florida: December 10, 6-8 pm EST

South Atlantic Region:

Florida, Georgia: December 2, 3-5 pm EST

North & South Carolina, Virginia: December 3, 6-8 pm EST

Florida: December 9, 3-5 pm EST

The visioning process is the first stage in a three-phase approach approved during the 2020 Senate Appropriations Committee for the 2020-2023 Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic Greater Amberjack Research Program. The program is to be implemented through a cooperative agreement with the National Sea Grant Office (NSGO) and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).

The listening sessions give the opportunity for greater amberjack stakeholders to let their opinions and ideas become heard which may help direct possible research outcomes.

“Often individuals that interact with the species in multiple ways can have some of the best insight as they are exposed to issues encountered across various stakeholder groups and provide ideas for research/management that empathizes with a wider range of users,” said Michael Sipos, a Florida Sea Grant agent at UF/IFAS Extension Collier County. “This is also a great way for participants to hear other stakeholder group opinions and learn how they may interact with the fishery.”

For more information about the 2020-2023 Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic Greater Amberjack Research Program, visit www.flseagrant.org/fisheries/gaj-researchprogram/

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Nov 24, 2020
Published in North Carolina Fishing
RALEIGH, N.C. (November 24, 2020)  — With deer season here, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission reminds hunters that the importation of whole deer carcasses is prohibited and that strict ...

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Nov 23, 2020
Published in Hawaii Fishing
DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE 
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: November 22, 2020

DLNR CONSERVATION OFFICERS SWEEP LITTLE BEACH AT MAKENA STATE PARK

To view video click on photo or view at this link: https://vimeo.com/482501711

(Makena State Park, Maui) – A team of eight officers from the DLNR Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE) conducted a law enforcement operation this evening at Little Beach in Makena State Park on Maui.

For many years, the beach has been the site of large Sunday night parties and drum circles, where alcohol and drug use, public nudity, and littering have been chronic problems. Officers cited one woman for having alcohol in a state park and warned others about COVID-19 rules. Many of the beach goers were not physically distancing or wear masks when close to others.

Tonight’s operation is part of a continued push to stop law breaking at Little Beach. DLNR will release more details about this operation on Monday, along with additional photographs and video.

# # #

Media Contact:

Dan Dennison
Senior Communications Manager
(808) 587-0396
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Read more

Nov 23, 2020
Published in Hawaii Fishing
DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE 
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: November 23, 2020

NATURE TRAIL IN THE SHADOW OF MAUNA KEA IS EDUCATIONAL & FAMILY-FRIENDLY 

Kaulana Manu Nature Trail is Latest Addition to Na Ala Hele Program 

 

To view video click on link or view at this link: https://vimeo.com/478093058

(HILO) – In a steady rain you hear the chorus of native Hawaiian birds. Jackson Bauer, with the DLNR Na Ala Hele Trails and Access Program, identifies the sing-song chirp of the ‘ōma’o and then the ‘elepaio, calling its own name. Such are the sounds of the native forest along the new Kaulana Manu Nature Trail on Hawai‘i island. Add in the natural beauty of ‘ōhi‘a and koa trees, and an intact profusion of native plants, shrubs and insects  — one even known as the happy-face spider — and it lives up to its billing as a nature lovers paradise. 

The less than one-mile-long loop trail winds through a section of forest at the 5,500-foot elevation. On a clear day Mauna Kea fills the view to the north from a viewing platform mid-way along the trail. The trail’s beginning, with tiny painted footsteps on the pavement, is one of the first signs, that this is a fun and educational place for all ages.  

In the planning for 15 years, in addition to the trail and interpretive features, there’s a new comfort station and parking lot. Bauer explains that birders have long visited and explored this area. He said, “This trail isn’t really just for birds. In Hawai‘i our megafauna (large animals) are birds because large mammals didn’t evolve in the islands. Coming on this trail you see pretty much 100% native forest with common trees like, ‘ōhi‘a, koa, ‘ōlapa, and everything in between; ground ferns and a few beautiful, endangered plants and insects.” 

The trail has a total of nine big interpretive panels and 25 small plant identification signs. On a rainy day, hearing the cacophony of birds and learning about the ancient kia manu or po‘e hahai manu, Hawaiian bird catchers, you might wonder if this is the sort of day where you would see them using their long, specialized poles to collect colorful bird feathers for implements and royal cloaks. The “bird fishers” panel is sure to spark keiki and adult imaginations. Another display asks what visitors can do to protect precious and sensitive forests. By the time you’ve reach this panel you naturally would have used the boot cleaning station at the trailhead to prevent the introduction of Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death in this area. This is an experience that demands you enjoy nature and makes you think about how we interact with and impact our natural environment. 

In a short walk, and in as much time as one cares to devote, visitors will learn a lot about the flora, fauna, and threats to this and other native forest. Bauer noted, “Rain and drizzle are pretty typical here and the birds actually love that. We are in the presence of Laka (a goddess of the forest) and this mist is her lei hoaka adorning the trees. On a sunny day you might not hear too many birds, though you might be a drier hiker.” 

The trail is at 21 mile-marker on the Daniel K. Inouye Highway 200 (Saddle Road). The State Legislature provided $1 million to construct the comfort station and parking lot. Today a kīpaepae was held: a ceremony that signifies the opening of a new path to travel—in this case the new Kaulana Manu Nature Trail. 

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Na Ala Hele Trails and Access Program: 

hawaiitrails.hawaii.gov 

Media Contact: 

Dan Dennison 
Senior Communications Manager 
(808) 587-0396 
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

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Nov 23, 2020
Published in Hawaii Fishing
DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE 
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: November 23, 2020

SUNDAY NIGHT GATHERINGS AT MAKENA STATE PARK CHALLENGE MANAGERS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Hundreds Gather with Little Regard to COVID-19 Protocols 

To view video please click on photo or view at this link: https://vimeo.com/482789744

(Mākena State Park, Maui) – It’s become a Sunday night tradition that regulars on Maui fiercely defend. Every week, for years, hundreds of people gather at Little Beach (Puʻu Ōlaʻi) to view the week’s first sunset. Long-time participants claim it’s a spiritual gathering. There’s a drum circle and dancing. Drummer George Chyz claimed that drumming is rooted in culture and this is a way for people to show their respect.  

DLNR Division of State Parks managers and officers from the DLNR Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE) say these gatherings are more like big beach parties, with alcohol and drug use, nudity, and littering. 

Law enforcement sweeps over the years, including one last night, have resulted in citations for violations like having alcohol in a state park, which is illegal. However, once word spreads through the ‘coconut wireless’ that the police are on the way, people begin to scramble.  

At dusk, on Sunday night, as soon as a team of eight DOCARE officers began walking down the beach toward an estimated 200-225 people at Little Beach, the majority packed up and began hiking back over a small ridge, to Big Beach and the parking lot. 

Officers cited one woman, a nurse, who had just moved to Maui from Colorado. As DOCARE Lt. John Yamamoto reminded the woman and her companion of the State’s current mandatory mask rules, they both quickly put theirs on. The nurse was cited for having alcohol in the park. 

State Parks Assistant Administrator Alan Carpenter said, “I was very taken aback that a nurse who arrived a week ago spent her first weekend on Maui at a potential super spreader event.  She presumably will be heading into a hospital soon. These are the kinds of actions that are insensitive and inappropriate anywhere, not the least of which at a crowded beach party.” 

While the breaking of rules and laws at Little Beach is always a concern, the COVID-19 pandemic has heightened fears about the potential spread of the virus between unrelated people, partying shoulder-to-shoulder; nearly all without protective face coverings. Earlier in the pandemic several cases of coronavirus were traced back to someone who had attended one of the Sunday drum-circles. 

Two drummers, who packed up to leave, once DOCARE arrived, claimed that with Maui’s COVID-19 infection rates much lower than most places on the mainland, there’s no need to worry on the Valley Isle. Kai Knight said, “We trust people and the tourists are being tested, so we don’t worry too much about it. Some people wear masks, and we respect that.” 

DOCARE Chief Jason Redulla responded, “These are the very types of attitudes and behaviors that could well set us back. We know from all of the expert health and safety advice, that large gatherings are potential super-spreaders.” Redulla asked, “Is it more important to attend these Sunday night gatherings or to practice personal responsibility?” 

Both DLNR divisions, parks and enforcement, are challenged with not having enough resources to regularly and consistently enforce the laws and rules at Mākena and on other state lands where large groups tend to congregate. Enforcement of COVID-19 mandates is particularly challenging because it’s hard to prove that people partying together on the beach don’t live in the same household and thus would be exempted from wearing masks. 

The pandemic has unfortunately brought law enforcement, management and health and safety issues to the fore. Redulla added, “We can’t dedicate our entire Maui DOCARE team to controlling the Sunday night parties at Makena, as this diverts our resources from other places and issues that need attention. All we can ask and hope for is for everyone to follow the rules and laws, and especially now to be respectful of others by practicing personal responsibility.” 

# # # 

Media Contact: 

Dan Dennison 
Senior Communications Manager 
(808) 587-0396 
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Read more

Nov 24, 2020
Published in Hawaii Fishing
DEPARTMENT OF LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES
News Release
DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR
SUZANNE D. CASE 
CHAIRPERSON

For Immediate News Release: November 23, 2020

CHANGE IN PROJECT SUBMISSION

(Honolulu) – The DLNR State Historic Preservation Division (SHPD) will be transitioning from its current submission process for the review of projects and federal undertakings to digital submission through the Hawaii Cultural Resource Information System (HICRIS).  After the transition is complete, HICRIS will be the only way that submittals for project review under Hawai’i Revised Statues or the National Historic Preservation Act will be accepted. 

The implementation of HICRIS satisfies the only outstanding item in the National Park Service (NPS) mandated Corrective Action Plan (II). The transition schedule will occur in accordance with the following schedule:

4:30 PM (16:30), Wednesday, November 25, 2020

Last date for submission through This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

After close-of-business on November 25, 2020, submissions sent to the intake address above will be returned to the submitter. 

In order to transfer data from SHPD’s current data management systems to HICRIS, there will be a transition period during which period during which SHPD will be unable to accept submissions.      

Transition period November 28 to December 16

  • During this time, no new submittals with be accepted. 
  • This time will be used to work on the migration of the data from our current systems to HICRIS.

HICRIS Launch Date December 17, 2020:

  • SHPD will begin accepting all submittals through HICRIS.
  • We will not be accepting mail-in or e-mail submittals after December 17, 2020.

After the December 17th launch, if you are unable to use HICRIS, have an extenuating circumstance, and require assistance with your submittal, please call SHPD at 808-692-8015.

What is HICRIS?

Hawaii Cultural Resource Information System (HICRIS)

  • HICRIS is an advanced Geographic Information System and data management system that integrates SHPD’s vast historic and cultural resource database as well as digitized paper records of Hawaiʻi’s recorded cultural resources.  It provides a single place to access those cultural records and related geographic data.
  • HICRIS will be an interactive, digital portal for agencies, municipalities, planners, researchers, and others who use historic preservation data and programs, such as the Hawaii`s chapter 6E and the federal section 106 review processes,  architectural and archaeological survey programs, the State and Federal Income Tax Credits for rehabilitation of historic properties, as well the State and National Registers of Historic Places Programs.

While the system will be operational by next month, due to the pandemic and the resulting funding crisis, it will be years before all SHPD’s legacy & reports data will be completely digitized, uploaded to HICRIS, and available.

# # #

Media contact:

AJ McWhorter
Communications Specialist
Hawai’i Department of Land and Natural Resources
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
808-587-0396 (Communications Office)

Read more

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